Hello, Robot. Design between man and machine

Hello, Robot. Design between man and machine

From May 27 to November 4, 2018, the Gewerbemuseum Winterthur in Switzerland will be hosting the exhibition “Hello, Robot. Design between man and machine “. The current boom in robotics that has made its way into our lives for some years now and has fundamentally changed our everyday lives is being examined in detail for the first time. More than 200 exhibits from the field of design and art, which are representative of the variations in the design of robotics, will be on display. These include robots from the home and maintenance sector, industrial sector, computer games, multimedia installations and even examples from film and literature. They all ought to make it evident that design plays a central role and acts as an interface between man and machine.

 

Re-defining robotics

Re-defining robotics

Re-defining robotics

Robotics has undergone a radical re-definition of digitisation over the past decade. As a result, they can no longer be seen as machines that help build cars or as washing machines. They are available in a variety of forms and are no longer designed exclusively by engineers and computer experts, rather by designers who shape the current boom in robotics. A few examples of these include communicating household appliances, the so-called Internet of Things alongside self-learning algorithms in computer programmes – Bots for short. The works presented come from Woody Allen, Disney/Pixar Animation Studios or NASA and many others. “Hello Robot” simultaneously demonstrates the ambivalence that has been reflected since the beginning of the spread of robotics. It initiates a debate about artificial intelligence, which is understood as the hope for a better, more technology-oriented world on the one hand, and on the other hand, echoes the fear of human incapacitation. And in this context, one also ends up wondering about the responsibility of designers, which is specifically addressed in the exhibition.

 

The division of the exhibition in four areas

The division of the exhibition in four areas

The exhibition is divided into four major areas. These include “Science and Fiction”, “Programmed for work”, “Companion and Assistant” and “Becoming One”, which comprehensively represent the evolution of robotics. The first part of the exhibition is about the old enthusiasm of the modern age for artificial beings and how popular culture shaped our understanding of robots. The second part deals with industry and the world of work, which was a substantial breakthrough for robotics – quite the opposite of today, where robots are repeatedly described in this context as a threat to workforce. “Hello Robot” looks at this topic from very different perspectives and at the same time questions where the boundaries lie between automatable work and human creativity. The third part of the exhibition demonstrates robotics as a familiar technology that we encounter in everyday life, in home and maintenance sector or as a digital pal. The last and hence fourth area deals with the increasing connect of humans and robotics, which also includes the instance of a so-called Smart City or the implantation of intelligent sensors.

 

Catalogue of the exhibition

Catalogue of the exhibition

Catalogue of the exhibition

The exhibit has an accompanying catalogue of Mateo Kries, Christoph Thun-Hohenstein and Amelie Klein. It comes in softcover with 328 pages and about 250 mostly coloured illustrations. It contains a glossary of the most important terms related to robotics as well as a detailed section on the exhibition, and is written in English.

Hello Robot*

 

Household robots that make your everyday life easier can also be found on our website in the category Robots. Happy browsing!

 

Header image: Robotic 3D printed pedestrian bridge
Other pictures from top to bottom:
AIBO robot by Sony Cooperation,
adaptive robot from AKA,
robot dress with 3D printing with Intel Edison microcontrollers together with the collaborative two-arm robot YuMi for small parts assembly
robot toy with Lego attachment</ span>

Posted on 22.05.2018

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